Rare 85-acre block of grassland in North Kerry for auction

A substantial farm in north Kerry will go to public auction on Wednesday, April 24, at 3pm, at the Horse Shoe bar and restaurant in Listowel.

The 85-acre holding is in the townland of Springmount, near the village of Duagh, 0.7km from the village and 9km from Listowel.

This is an area of good-quality agricultural land that focuses on dairying and beef cattle. This farm is beef cattle and it comes with a number of active entitlements, too.

“This land would formerly have belonged to Duagh House,” says selling agent Tom Dillon, of Listowel-based Dillon Prendiville.

“It was a period property that stood on the grounds dating from the middle of the 18th century.

“The house was demolished in 1960. The farm extends to 85 acres, with the bounds marked by the banks of the River Feale at the northern end.”

The holding is being offered in three lots. Lot 1 is a 24.4-acre portion at the southern end of the holding. This is set out in three divisions. It has mains water and has shared access from Springmount Road.

Lot 2 contains the remaining 60.8 acres. This lot has dual access from Springmount Road, through the original, tree-lined avenue that once led to Springmount House.

There is also direct access to the yard from Springmount Road and the lot has both electricity and mains water.

Lot 3 consists of the entire 85.2-acre holding.

The entitlements come to an annual total of €8,090. There are 30 in all, each worth €269.99, including the greening: Lot 1 has eight, while the remaining 22 come with the larger lot 2.

“Lot 2 has a cubicle house with electric scrapers and a modern slurry pit, a concrete yard, and a former milking parlour and dairy and associated outhouses.

“The farm is currently, primarily used as a silage ground and grazing,” says Tom, adding that the owners are selling because they are down-sizing.

For a farm of such a size to come up in this area is quite an event, so there should be a good deal of interest in it — both in the individual lots, as well as in the overall package.

“It’s a substantial holding to get that amount of acreage in one parcel in the north Kerry area,” says Tom, “so you’d have a lot of dairy farmers with 20- or 30-acre parcels of land rented, so it’s an opportunity for someone to put a block of land together of considerable size… Then, offering it in lots gives people the options and it splits quite well, geographically speaking, with the direct public road frontage on the larger lot and a shared access into the 24-acre parcel.”

Which lots will attract the stronger attention will be determined on the day. According to Tom, the enquiry levels so far don’t indicate one side over the other.

There has been a mixture of enquiries, in terms of interest in individual lots as against the entire holding, but, until the day itself, we won’t really know. There has been interest in both options.

The AMV is €640,000.

With such a rare holding of quality, one might imagine that it will achieve a good deal more than €7,500 per acre. Over the last few years, prices achieved for such land in this area have varied from €8,000 up to €15,000 per acre and, as with all public auctions, it’s not where it starts, but where it finishes, that will count.

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