More women pursuing farming careers: Teagasc

More women pursuing  farming careers: Teagasc

From two female students enrolled five years ago, the number of women choosing the level-5 Certificate in Agriculture has increased to 13 starting the Green Cert course earlier this month at the Teagasc Kildalton College in south Kilkenny, of a 127 total enrolled on this course (up 50% from last year).

The Teagasc Education Vision report highlighted the low rate of female graduates in further education on Teagasc programmes.

This contrasts with Quality and Qualification Ireland (QQI) data indicating about 51% of all further education awards are to females.

Kildalton College has championed female graduates.

The recent increase in female enrolment is an indication of more women pursuing a farming career.

College Principal Tim Ashmore highlighted the diverse backgrounds of the female students, from the bordering counties of Kilkenny, Wexford, Tipperary and Waterford, but also come from Clare, Offaly, Laois and Wicklow.

The majority of the female students come from a farm.

Mr Ashmore welcomed three students who do not come from a farm.

These first-year students join students from other agriculture, equine and horticulture courses, and more than 400 WIT agriculture, agricultural science, horticulture, forestry and food science students who come to Kildalton weekly as part of their degree programmes.

In total, more than 1,200 students will study land-based courses at Kildalton this academic year.

Mr Ashmore encouraged anyone interested in a career in agriculture, equine or horticulture to attend the College open day on Friday, October 4.

More on this topic

Fifth of college students from ‘affluent’ homes - studyFifth of college students from ‘affluent’ homes - study

The basic agricultural qualification to qualify as a young, trained farmerThe basic agricultural qualification to qualify as a young, trained farmer

Secret Diary of an Irish teacher: 'Mirror, mirror on the classroom wall; what is gender after all?'Secret Diary of an Irish teacher: 'Mirror, mirror on the classroom wall; what is gender after all?'

Colleges to receive €14.25m to expand options for studentsColleges to receive €14.25m to expand options for students

More in this Section

The basic agricultural qualification to qualify as a young, trained farmerThe basic agricultural qualification to qualify as a young, trained farmer

Report and financial statements detail busy 2018 for TeagascReport and financial statements detail busy 2018 for Teagasc

60 acres inside Limerick’s future ring road for auction60 acres inside Limerick’s future ring road for auction

Pig farmers look for at least €1.90Pig farmers look for at least €1.90


Lifestyle

'When a role became available in The River Lee following the refurbishment, I jumped at the chance!'You've Been Served: Sinead McDonald of The River Lee on life as a Brand Manager

It’s the personal stories from Bruce Springsteen that turn his new ‘Western Stars’ documentary into something special, the director tells Esther McCarthy.Bruce Springsteen's Western Stars documentary more than just a music film

Apart from the several variations in its spelling in Irish and English, Inishtubbrid, Co Clare is also recognised by three other names: Wall’s Island; O’Grady’s Island and Inishtubber which surely puts it up there as the island with most names — not counting say Inisvickillane, Co Kerry which has about 33 variations to that spelling.The Islands of Ireland: In search of tranquility

More and more communities and volunteers are taking on environmental tasks around the country. In Clonmel, Co Tipperary, for example, people have united to get rid of Himalayan balsam, an invasive plant, from the banks of the River Suir.‘Bashing’ invasive plants

More From The Irish Examiner