€1m sought for high-quality residential Golden Vale farm

€1m sought for high-quality residential Golden Vale farm
Aerial view of the residential farm at Doona, Milford, Charleville, Co Cork, which is expected to realise €1m.

The sale of a 75-acre residential holding in the heart of the Golden Vale is bound to stop a few people in their tracks.

It is a farm of quality and substance, and is not the kind that turns up every day of the week.

The property in question is located in the townland of Doona, immediately to the south of the village of Milford in North Cork, about 14km west of Charleville.

The Cork-Kerry border is barely a kilometre from here, and the land in this part of the world is typified by fertile plains where dairying is the predominant sector.

There is no shortage of tillage activity too, with the Golden Vale land not averse to being used for growing crops other than grass.

Given the strong prices paid for tillage land in recent years, it will be interesting to see from what sector the next owner of this farm will emerge over the coming weeks and months.

While some factors might point to this farm going to auction (not unexpected for an executor sale of quality land in the Golden Vale), this is not the case here, and the property is due to be sold by private treaty.

The entire holding extends to 75 acres, and it is being offered in a series of lots.

Lot 1 consists of 30 acres with farm buildings; Lot 2 is 21.5 acres; Lot 3 is 22.5 acres of grassland; Lot 4 is a two-storey residence; Lot 5 is the entire holding.

“The land quality is top class,” says selling agent Richard Ryan of the Kilmallock office of GVM Auctioneers who points out that, while it is close to the village, there are certainly no indications of the possibility of any future residential development potential.

“There’s been a strong level of interest in the property so far,” he says of the holding, which includes a very good quality home.

According to the selling agents, the dwelling was built around 2003, and it is a modern two-storey red-brick house. It has four bedrooms, and stands on a neat curtilage of garden and hard drive and turning area.

The collection of farm buildings includes a four-column slatted shed and four-column hay barn; a lean-to with cubicle accommodation and auto scraper and easy-feed passageway; a three-column hay barn with lean-to building; an old milking parlour; a cattle crush; a dungstead; a silage slab; and ancillary out-offices.

In addition, there is the original old residence amongst the farm buildings. This latter building has a galvanised roof and hasn’t been lived in for several years.

According to the agents, the outbuildings are in good condition.

The farm enjoys a good level of road frontage. Although it’s a relatively long, narrow holding, there are two public roads running through it, and this provides it with good access to the well laid-out fields.

With a number of progressive farmers close by, there should be some strong interest in the property locally.

It’s also large enough to attract attention from farther afield, because it is seldom that this large quantity of high-class land makes its way onto the market.

The price, therefore, should reflect such a top-class product, and the expectation of €1m (€13,000 per acre) seems like an accurate assessment.

Much will depend on how the different lots perform in the market, and on whether the appetite will be stronger for the parts or for its overall sum.

One could certainly see the house being sold separately. It is rare, with a farm for sale, that it has such an additional asset that can be easily separated from the remainder of the holding.

“It’s a very good farm,” says Richard. “It might sell in the entire, and it might sell in lots.

“I suppose the market will determine what way it’s going to be sold.”

More on this topic

Forestry KTGs and Green Cert changes can end fear of the unknownForestry KTGs and Green Cert changes can end fear of the unknown

Land for sale partly zoned for residential housing outside DunmanwayLand for sale partly zoned for residential housing outside Dunmanway

New EU Commissioner may pounce if live exports go wrongNew EU Commissioner may pounce if live exports go wrong

Non-European Union markets rescue beef exportersNon-European Union markets rescue beef exporters

More in this Section

Forestry KTGs and Green Cert changes can end fear of the unknownForestry KTGs and Green Cert changes can end fear of the unknown

Ireland’s first ever Animal Health Awareness DayIreland’s first ever Animal Health Awareness Day

Legal advice with Karen Walsh: Guardianship it isn’t automaticLegal advice with Karen Walsh: Guardianship it isn’t automatic

This week’s Agritechnica trade fair is a good place to check out the changing shape of tractorsThis week’s Agritechnica trade fair is a good place to check out the changing shape of tractors


Lifestyle

From Monday, November 11, RTÉ On Climate looks at issues affecting us all including Paul Cunningham’s report from the Arctic Circle.The Shape I'm In: RTÉ journalist Paul Cunningham

Sex advice with Suzi Godson.Sex file: Hard to have sex when you don’t feel sexy

I wish everyone could discover the magic of making a loaf of bread.Darina Allen: Preparing for National Homemade Bread Day

More From The Irish Examiner