Wednesday’s TV tips

Wednesday’s TV tips

Fair Game (Film4, 6.50pm)

(2010) Valerie Plame (Naomi Watts), whose CIA status is unknown to almost her entire circle of family and friends, is unexpectedly caught in the crossfire when her husband Joe (Sean Penn) writes a scathing opinion piece for The New York Times about the government’s claims that Iraq has weapons of mass destruction.

A subsequent article in The Washington Post exposes Valerie and she is shunned by her colleagues, including Jack McAllister (Michael Kelly), who need to protect their own identities.

Fair Game is a gripping snapshot of the events leading up to the war in Iraq and the subsequent fallout for Valerie, Joe and their family, deftly handed by director Doug Liman.


Rachel’s Coastal Cooking (RTE One, 7.30pm)

Wednesday’s TV tips

Rachel Allen continues her culinary tour of the coast, and arrives at the pretty harbour town of Kinsale.

Local restaurateur Olivier Queva has invited her to go free-diving. And the first challenge is to get into the wetsuit he’s provided.

Full of enthusiasm they head out in search of crabs. Back on dry land they set up an outdoor kitchen on the beach, and prepare a delicious treat of crab and blood orange salad.

Refreshed, Rachel travels to the village of Ballinspittle to pick up some bread and walnut oil for her raw beetroot soup, and there she hears about a microgreen business in Ballinadee – Till and Bloom – who can provide some pretty edible flowers for her recipe.


Welcome to the Mosque (BBC2, 8pm)

Wednesday’s TV tips

Robb Leech provides an insight into what life is like behind the Mosque’s walls, from rituals and marriage, to racism experienced by older community members when they were growing up.

He witnesses segregation and meets younger members of the community, who are afraid of ’free-mixing’ with the opposite sex.

He also captures the response to the news of the three London schoolgirls who left Britain to join Isis jihadists in Syria, including frantic phone calls and the journey to Istanbul with the girls’ families to find them.


Garda Down Under (RTE One, 8.30pm)

Wednesday’s TV tips

Garda Down Under follows the lives of former Gardaí who have relocated to Western Australia and joined the police force there.

In this episode: A medical emergency in Kununurra, a car-jacking in Perth and a surprise family visit in Dublin.


Grand Designs (Ch4, 9pm)

Wednesday’s TV tips

Kevin McCloud follows the progress of 37-year-old Angelo Mastropietro, as he transforms a damp, dark and abandoned cave in Worcestershire.

Having recently been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Angelo wants to create a retreat to help him cope with the news and become a 21st century caveman.

He has a budget of £100,000 and plans to almost single-handedly carve, cut and drill into the hillside to make the cave comfortable for contemporary living.

However, there is no manual for a project of this kind, and the unique challenge soon becomes an obsession.


Doctor Foster (BBC1, 9pm)

After the revelation that those around her are also holding onto secrets, Gemma throws herself into a new start with her husband.

However, when the respected senior GP discovers that someone is out to get her on a professional level, she must steel herself as the pressure begins to mount.

Simon appears to be supportive of her, but she needs to make a decision as to whether or not the man she married is to be trusted.

Drama, starring Suranne Jones, Bertie Carvel and Thusitha Jayasundera.


Dark Side of the Greens (BBC4, 9pm)

If you’re a fan of the award-winning 2011 documentary You’ve Been Trumped (which followed Donald Trump’s attempts to build a golf course in Scotland against the wishes of some of the locals), then this sequel is must-see viewing.

Here, filmmaker Anthony Baxter is on a journey to global hot spots where Trump and other developers are planning luxury golf resorts and locals are making a stand.

The film features appearances by actor Alec Baldwin, environmentalist Robert Kennedy Jr, and Trump himself.


Asian Provocateur (BBC3, 10pm)

Romesh Ranganathan grew up in Horsham, he doesn’t speak Tamil, has no idea about his cultural heritage and has little desire to go to Sri Lanka.

As his mother Shanti says – he’s a coconut: Sri Lankan on the outside but British on the inside.

In this six part series, she wants him to connect to his roots, so she’s decided to send Romesh on a trip around the motherland to learn about the religion, language and culture.

But how will the comedian and panel game regular get on in episode one when he goes to meet his Uncle Thiru – who may not be his uncle at all?


Big Nothing (Channel 4, 2.10am)

(2006) Jean-Baptiste Andrea’s black comedy follows unemployed teacher Charlie Wood (David Schwimmer), who is fed up with life and lands a thankless job in a call centre, where he meets affable co-worker Gus Dickinson (Simon Pegg).

Charlie loses the job that very same day and rails against the world, agreeing to help Gus and his sex-bomb on-off girlfriend Josie to pull off an ambitious scam to blackmail a holy man who has been visiting illegal pornography websites.

Unfortunately, the best-laid plans always end in disaster and Charlie is soon knee-deep in trouble as he crosses paths with a tenacious FBI special agent, and to make matters worse, Charlie’s girlfriend just happens to be a local cop, who will have to put him behind bars when the scam goes awry.

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