Wait a minute - we’ve been pronouncing Ariana Grande’s name wrong this entire time

Ariana Grande is a huge worldwide star adored by millions, made evident at her concerts with fans screaming her name in admiration.

However, it seems everybody has been saying her name wrong and we didn’t even know.

Appearing on the Apple Music Show, Beats 1, Ariana dropped the revelation that her last name is commonly mispronounced.

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thank you @oldmanebro ♡ @beats1official

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Speaking with host, Ebro Darden, Ariana said it was her brother, Frankie, who was behind the change.

She explained that her brother changed their surname to 'Grahn-day' because he felt 'Grandey' was the "Americanised version of it."

"It made it more, like, chill whatever.”

“And then my brother was like ‘We should say ‘Grahn-day’. It’s so fun to say it. It’s like funny, it’s a funny name.”

However, Ariana added how she wants to say “Grandey” more because it reminds her of her late grandfather.

Ariana's new album Sweetener is out now.

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