U2 'taught Skunk Anansie how to be a big band'

U2 'taught Skunk Anansie how to be a big band'

U2 taught Skunk Anansie “how to be a band”.

The ‘Weak’ hitmakers supported the veteran rockers on tour when they were just starting out, and admit the experience taught them how to behave towards other acts they perform with.

Skunk Anansie singer Skin told BANG Showbiz: “U2 was amazing, they really taught us how to be a band on tour. It was quite early in our career and they taught us the courtesy of how a big band behaves towards a bunch of nobodies.

“They gave us champagne in our dressing room on the first night, which I have always done on every tour since to say: ‘Welcome to the tour’, it just sets it off in a nice vibe, putting your hand out to say: ‘We are nice, we will look after you.’

“They let us use all of their lighting that they could and didn’t turn our sound down, as many bands do. And that’s what we do as well, they can use our full rig with their lighting and sound person.

"They let us come into the dressing room and hang out with them every night. You could tell what they’re like because all the crew were lovely and happy for you to be there. It was a nice atmosphere.”

Skunk Anansie release their greatest hits collection ‘Smashes and Trashes’ on October 2.

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