TV producer claims she was groped at 10 Downing Street

TV producer claims she was groped at 10 Downing Street

TV producer claims she was groped at 10 Downing Street

A female TV producer has claimed she was groped by a Government official during a visit to 10 Downing Street.

Daisy Goodwin, the creator of hit ITV series Victoria, alleged that the man put his hand on her breast during a meeting to discuss a proposed television programme.

Her story is the latest in a series of allegations of unwanted sexual advances at Westminster, with First Secretary of State Damian Green and international trade minister Mark Garnier facing inquiries over claims of inappropriate conduct.

Ms Goodwin told the Radio Times that she dealt with the situation by humiliating the official verbally, but did not report the incident, which took place during David Cameron’s time in office between 2010 and 2016.

10 Downing Street in London, where Daisy Goodwin says she met the official (Victoria Jones/PA)
10 Downing Street in London, where Daisy Goodwin says she met the official (Victoria Jones/PA)

She said she was cross at the time, but was not traumatised. But she told the magazine she was now concerned that the man involved may have “tried it on” with someone less able to cope with the situation.

Ms Goodwin said the official, who was a few years younger than her, showed her into an office at Number 10 which was dominated by a portrait of Margaret Thatcher.

When they sat down side by side, she was surprised when the official put his feet on her chair, and said that her sunglasses “made me look like a Bond Girl”, she said.

Ms Goodwin said she tried to divert the conversation back to the subject of their meeting.

But she added: “At the end of the meeting we both stood up and the official, to my astonishment, put his hand on my breast.

“I looked at the hand and then in my best Lady Bracknell voice said: `Are you actually touching my breast?’ He dropped his hand and laughed nervously.”

The cover of the latest edition of Radio Times, which contains an article by Daisy Goodwin alleging improper touching by a Government official.
The cover of the latest edition of Radio Times, which contains an article by Daisy Goodwin alleging improper touching by a Government official.

Ms Goodwin said she left Downing Street in a state of “high dudgeon”, but that it did not occur to her to report the incident.

“I wasn’t traumatised, I was cross, but by the next day it had become an anecdote, The Day I Was Groped In Number 10,” she said.

But she added: “Now, in the light of all the really shocking stories that have come out about abusive behaviour by men in power from Hollywood to Westminster, I wonder if my Keep Calm and Carry on philosophy, inherited from my parents, was correct? The answer is, I am not sure.

“I think humiliating the official was probably the appropriate punishment, but suppose he tried it on with someone less able to defend themselves?”

A 10 Downing Street spokesperson said: “Allegations such as this are taken very seriously. The Cabinet Office would look into any formal complaint, should one be made.”


More in this Section

Woody Allen: I don’t feel vindicated by recent film successWoody Allen: I don’t feel vindicated by recent film success

Conductor discusses impact of child sexual abuse with Desert Island Discs hostConductor discusses impact of child sexual abuse with Desert Island Discs host

Stacey Solomon celebrates son’s first birthdayStacey Solomon celebrates son’s first birthday

Britain’s Got Talent judges wowed by straw playerBritain’s Got Talent judges wowed by straw player


Lifestyle

Last week, I wrote about 'small is beautiful' as a key to an improved environment for all living things after this Covid crisis is finally over. As I wrote, I saw, in the mind's eye, the village where I live in west Cork and from which my wife and I are temporarily exiled.Damien Enright: Community spirit can ensure we pull through - together

Fifty years ago, a fox was spotted in Dublin’s St. Stephen’s Green. The unfortunate animal was chased by local ‘gurriers’. It took refuge in a tree but was promptly stoned to death.Richard Collins: Wildlife taking back the streets of our cities

The north pier on Cape Clear has been eerily quiet these last few months as no visitors disembark. The ferry is not unloading boatloads of tourists from Baltimore, 45 minutes away, or from Schull, as it would normally.The Islands of Ireland: Cape Clear tells its side of the story

If the Donegal postman and amateur weather forecaster has it right, we could be in for water shortages in the coming months. Michael Gallagher, who predicted the scorching summer of 2018 and the 2010 freeze-up, says we’ll have a ‘lovely’ summer.Donal Hickey: Demand for water to soar

More From The Irish Examiner