Thursday’s TV tips

Thursday’s TV tips

Celebrity Big Brother – Launch Night (TV3, 9pm)

The regular folk have served their time, which can only mean one thing: more celebrities are heading into the Big Brother house.

The fly-on-the-wall fun begins once more as Emma Willis invites a fresh group of famous faces to move in together and have their every word and move recorded for the enjoyment of the viewing public.

Tonight’s launch show will see twists and turns from the get go as the house takes on a 'UK v US' theme with a range of celebs from both sides of the Atlantic.


Stephen Fry’s Central America (UTV, 9pm)

Thursday’s TV tips

It’s seven years since Stephen Fry embarked on an epic trip to each of the USA’s 50 states for the BBC.

Frankly, it was a bit of a rushed job, with some destinations appearing for just a few moments each. Hopefully, this tour will be a little more in-depth.

This time, as the title has already revealed to you, he is sampling the delights available south of the border, beginning with a trip to Mexico.

Stephen starts on the Sante Bridge, which separates El Paso in Texas from Ciudad Juarez, an important transit point for drug cartels – and a place regarded as one of Mexico’s most dangerous cities.

En route to Chihuahua, he meets some of the area’s cowboys, then travels by train to the Sierra Madre mountains, where he’s dazzled by its natural wonders.


Who Do You Think You Are? (BBC1, 9pm)

Thursday’s TV tips

Actor and stage director Derek Jacobi enjoyed a relatively humble upbringing in Leytonstone, London, where his father ran a sweet shop and his mother worked in a drapery, but research into his maternal side of the family soon uncovers a link to a far more intriguing past.

Discovering that his great-grandmother’s name was Salome Laplain, Jacobi finds that he is descended from a wealthy French Huguenot who fled religious persecution, and who has connections to royalty on this side of the channel.


The Other Prince William (Ch4, 9pm)

Thursday’s TV tips

The story of the romance between Prince William of Gloucester and glamorous divorcee, model and former air hostess Zsuzsi Starkloff, which ended with the former’s tragic death in a plane crash in 1972 at the age of just 30.

William was the Queen’s cousin and pageboy at her wedding to Prince Philip in 1947, at which time he was fourth in line to the throne.

However, his forbidden romance caused consternation at Buckingham Palace, and Starkloff speaks on camera for the first time about their relationship, which began when he was stationed at the British Embassy in Tokyo in 1968.

Contributors include William’s colleague Shigeo Kitano, his history tutor at Eton, Giles St Aubyn, and Ray Bradbury, the photographer who captured the final picture of the prince before his death.

Narrated by Paul McGann. Part of the Secret History strand.


The Descendants (More4, 9.00pm)

(2011) Matthew King (George Clooney) stares forlornly at his adrenaline-junkie wife Liz (Patricia Hastie) as she lies in a vegetative state after a water-skiing accident.

Doctors tell him there is no hope of recovery and everyone should say their farewells.

With a heavy heart, Matthew bravely gathers together his 10-year-old daughter Scottie (Amara Miller) and his rebellious 17-year-old daughter Alex (Shailene Woodley).

The older child stopped talking to her mother shortly before the accident and it transpires that Alex discovered Liz was having an affair with real estate agent Brian Speer (Matthew Lillard).

Matthew is devastated but eventually decides to take a two-day vacation to find Brian and inform his rival of Liz’s injury.


Very British Problems (Ch4, 10pm)

James Corden, Jonathan Ross, Ruth Jones and Stephen Mangan are among those ruminating on the stereotypical Brit’s excruciating inability to express raw emotions and feelings.

Topics under the comedy microscope include the inner rage that can consume people, and which they keep to themselves, being unable to accept even the most innocent of compliments and a bizarre reluctance to complain in shops and restaurants, even when it is painfully obvious that the service falls far short of expectations.


Where I Am (RTE One, 10.10pm)

Thursday’s TV tips

The story of gay US author Robert Drake's return to Ireland more than a decade after he was left for dead in a vicious attack at his Sligo home, Where I Am follows his journey back to the town where his life was changed forever as he confronts his new reality.

In January 1999, 35-year-old gay American author, Robert Drake, was viciously assaulted and left for dead by two young men in a house he was renting with his partner in Sligo town. Suffering permanent brain damage, the incident left him unable to walk and derailed a promising literary career just as Drake was beginning to make a name for himself.

A subsequent court case sought to demonise him as a predatory gay man with his attackers, Glen Mahon and Ian Monaghan, ultimately sentenced to eight years in prison.

Confined to his hospital bed and unable to speak, Drake was not present to defend his reputation at the trial. Where I Am gives voice to his story.


Black Rock (Film4, 10.50pm)

(2012) Based on a script by mumblecore actor and director Mark Duplass, Black Rock is a tense thriller about a battle for survival in the wilderness that tests the resolve of three female friends.

Sarah (Kate Bosworth) is desperate to reconnect with her childhood pals Lou (Lake Bell) and Abby (Katie Aselton) so she suggests a trip to the remote island, where they shared some of their favourite memories.

On the island, the women meet former soldiers Alex (Anslem Richardson), Derek (Jay Paulson) and Henry (Will Bouvier), who were dishonourably discharged and are spending the weekend hunting the local wildlife.

A tragic accident leads to the death of one of the men and Abby, Lou and Sarah run for their lives from the other two men, who resolve to stalk and hunt the women as if they were animals.


Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit on the Side (3e, 11pm)

The hilarious Rylan Clark returns to host Celebrity Big Brother’s Bit on the Side, the only place to catch up on all things CBB!

Join Rylan for the latest news and reactions from the House, plus a host of special guests each week and live debate in the studio.


The Late Review with Ivan Yates (TV3, 11pm)

Thursday’s TV tips

The Late Review is a brand new peak-time news, arts and review show which will air throughout the summer.

Assembled from Ireland’s leading journalistic minds, the show will be hosted by a different guest presenter each week.

The presenter will not only host, but curate the show alongside the producer meaning that they will have a deep interest in subjects discussed in each show.

The Late Review will analyse the big stories of the day, provide debate and chat with leading authors, artists and musicians.

Plus, they’ll be the first to bring you the front pages leading the next day’s daily papers.

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