Robbie and wife expecting first child

Robbie Williams is to become a father for the first time.

The 'Angels' singer has announced his wife Ayda Field is pregnant and says he can't wait for the baby to arrive.

Writing on his website, the Take That star said: "Hey friendlies, I've been keeping a secret from you all. Me and Ayda are going to be a Mummy and Daddy this year!!!!!!!! We had sex! It works!

"We've seen scans and cried... looked at babies in commercials and teared up... the nursery is already planned. Basically I'm in love with a little person growing in mummy's belly... and can't wait to be a daddy. Crying now.

"Much love, much joy. Roberto, Mum and Little Bump. xxx (sic)"

Robbie, 38, and Ayda, 32, married in August 2010 and they have made no secret of their desire to have a family.

Speaking last year, he said: "She wants a football team. I want two. A boy and a girl.

"[We're going to call them] Woody and Sonny! Cool, eh? She wants to get on it now, but, I just got back off tour. There's a stretch from now until Christmas and then, we'll do some practicing."

More in this Section

Channel 4 series lifts lid on former Daily Mail boss Paul DacreChannel 4 series lifts lid on former Daily Mail boss Paul Dacre

Neil and Katya Jones announce splitNeil and Katya Jones announce split

BBC announces Michael Morpurgo adaptation for ChristmasBBC announces Michael Morpurgo adaptation for Christmas

Myleene Klass throws ‘glamping’ party for daughter’s birthdayMyleene Klass throws ‘glamping’ party for daughter’s birthday


Lifestyle

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

Take no risks, ‘do all the right things’, and you’ll lead a comfortable, but dull, existence. ‘Living dangerously’, on the other hand, yields ‘highs’ of excitement usually followed, alas, by pain andRichard Collins: Live fast and die young or last up to 500 years

More From The Irish Examiner