Poor script leaves 'Mad Money' bankrupt

When her husband Don (Ted Danson) loses his job, resourceful mother Bridget (Diane Keaton) takes a mundane job as a cleaner at the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank.

Here, she becomes intrigued by the banknotes that are due to be taken out of circulation via the shredder and hatches a scheme to steal them with the help of fellow employees Nina (Queen Latifah) and Jackie (Katie Holmes).

Debuting on DVD and deservedly so, Mad Money is a generic crime caper which squanders the potentially winning chemistry between the leads, albeit with Katie Holmes woefully miscast as the ditz opposite an ever-solid Keaton and Latifah, who both possess the acting chops and comic timing to make something out of their two-dimensional heroines.

Glenn Gers’ screenplay has neither the subtlety nor the intelligence to probe the (im)morality of the female protagonists’ actions, whiling away the blessedly brief running time with pointless romantic subplots. To rent or buy, Mad Money would be a crime.

Star Rating: 2/5

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