Newsman sorry for 'amateur mistake' in mixing up Jackson and Fishburne

Newsman sorry for 'amateur mistake' in mixing up Jackson and Fishburne

A Los Angeles newscaster has apologised to actor Samuel L Jackson for confusing him with Laurence Fishburne.

KTLA entertainment reporter Sam Rubin was interviewing Jackson about the forthcoming film Robocop when he asked the actor if he had received a lot of reaction to his Super Bowl commercial.

When Jackson asked: “What Super Bowl commercial?” Rubin began to apologise, but It was too late.

In a lengthy but mostly light-hearted dressing down, Jackson let the reporter know it was Fishburne who made the popular commercial for Kia cars.

"You're the entertainment reporter for this station, and you don't know the difference between me and Laurence Fishburne?" said Jackson.

“We may be all black and famous but we don’t all look alike,” he said in the video that quickly went viral.

Mr Rubin, who is white, was back on the air 30 minutes later, apologising at length, saying he was "really embarrassed about…what was a very amateur mistake".

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