Mrs Brown is queen of the box office

Mrs Brown is queen of the box office

‘Mrs Brown’s Boys - D’Movie’ has enjoyed the biggest-ever opening weekend for an Irish film at the box office here, clocking up a record €1.02m in ticket sales.

This knocks previous record holder ‘Michael Collins’ (€648,928) off the top spot, with Angela’s Ashes (€641,292) and The Guard (€433,010) coming in third and fourth.

“We are thrilled that Irish cinemagoers have embraced the phenomenon that is Agnes Brown,” said Dave Burke of Universal Pictures Ireland, the film’s distributors.

The results are truly spectacular””

‘Mrs Brown’s Boys - D’Movie’, which stars comedian Brendan O’Carroll, is currently the No.1 film in Ireland and the UK taking in a total of £4.27m since opening.

Mrs Brown is queen of the box office

Despite mixed reviews from critics - Alan Corr in the RTE Guide described it as “the least fun I’ve ever had in a darkened room”, while the BBC’s Graham Norton lauded it as “a love letter to Dublin” - it must be doing something right.

Have you seen it yet? What did you think?

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