Morricone: I'll never work with Tarantino again after Django

Morricone: I'll never work with Tarantino again after Django

Ennio Morricone didn't approve of the graphic scenes in 'Django Unchained'.

The prolific composer and conductor wrote the soundtrack to the award-winning movie, directed by Quentin Tarantino, but admitted he wasn't pleased by a gruesome plot in the 2012 film, and ordered the 51-year-old filmmaker to remove it.

Speaking in the spring/summer The Big Black Book issue of the UK's Esquire magazine, he said: "In 'Django Unchained', there's that sequence where a dog attacks and eats a man. That was too much. I sent a message to Quentin Tarantino and told him that was too strong."

However the scene remained in the movie, and added to Ennio's disappointment about the placement of his music, which he has previously admitted made him decide never to work with him again.

He said he "wouldn't like to work with him again, on anything," adding he "places music in his films without coherence" and "you can't do anything with someone like that".

And the 86-year-old star revealed in 2013 he had stuck to his promise, but his refusal to work with the star meant he used one of the tracks he had previously penned.

He added: "He said last year he wanted to work with me again ever since 'Inglourious Basterds', but I told him I couldn't, because he didn't give me enough time. So he just used a song I had written previously."

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