Monty Python's Terry Jones reveals he can no longer write at dementia awareness event

Monty Python's Terry Jones reveals he can no longer write at dementia awareness event

Monty Python star Terry Jones has said that he can no longer write as he helped publicise the issue of dementia.

News that the 75-year-old, who directed Monty Python's films Life Of Brian and The Meaning Of Life, had been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia was announced last year.

Today, the writer and director attended an afternoon tea at the Royal Hospital Chelsea to help people living with cancer and dementia.

Jones told the Press Association he was now unable to write.

Nutritionist Jane Clarke, whose clients have included David Beckham and Jamie Oliver, held the event, while Prue Leith, who could become the next Great British Bake Off judge, also attended.

Ms Clarke, whose father suffers from dementia, said: "It's great that Terry was able to come along ... to raise awareness."

She has launched a website, Nourish, to provide support, nutritional information and recipes to help people living with dementia, cancer and other serious illnesses.

Ms Clarke said that loss of appetite, swallowing and chewing difficulties can make eating well a problem.

"We want to really empower families and communities, show people how to support people who are vulnerable in the community and it's through food," she said.

"That is the most beautiful thing you can do."

Terry Jones with Prue Leith (left) and nutritionist to the stars Jane Clarke at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, today.
Terry Jones with Prue Leith (left) and nutritionist to the stars Jane Clarke at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, today.

Food critic Leith said: "Although I have spent an awful lot of my time trying to make sure children's food is better or prisoners' food is better or general hospital patients' food is better, I think the really neglected group are older people and people suffering from dementia, because eating becomes a real problem for them.

"If your hand shakes so much, quite often you can't swallow or chew and most of all you lose appetite and energy for eating."

More in this Section

Six things to know about Cats ahead of Friday’s trailer releaseSix things to know about Cats ahead of Friday’s trailer release

Love Island’s Joanna: Seeing Michael try to crack on with Amber is hard to watchLove Island’s Joanna: Seeing Michael try to crack on with Amber is hard to watch

Paul McCartney writing stage musical of It’s A Wonderful Life in career firstPaul McCartney writing stage musical of It’s A Wonderful Life in career first

Liz Hurley’s son Damian looks just like his mother in new ad campaignLiz Hurley’s son Damian looks just like his mother in new ad campaign


Lifestyle

Pinnies, cookie cutters and wooden spoons at the ready.Food projects to do with the kids this summer

Stop. Climbing. Uluru.As tourists rush to climb Uluru despite an incoming ban – 5 ways to enjoy the rock respectfully

Whether it’s wearing acid-washed jeans or booty shorts, the model is a denim chameleon.As she lands a big new campaign, here’s why Kendall Jenner is a denim icon

Don’t want to just chuck away all that clutter? Gabrielle Fagan reveals simple ways to get it out of sight.Seek and hide: 6 storage solutions to keep you and your rooms cool and calm this summer

More From The Irish Examiner