Liverpool manager in 'first and last' film role

Liverpool manager in 'first and last' film role

Liverpool legend Kenny Dalglish said his appearance in a new film set around the 2005 Champions League Final is his “first and last” on the big screen.

Dalglish, who was confirmed as the club’s new manager earlier this week, appears in 'Will' – about a young boy who runs away to Istanbul to watch the game in memory of his dead father.

Players Steven Gerrard and Jamie Carragher also appear in the film set around the game where Liverpool beat AC Milan on penalties having been 3-0 down.

Asked if it was his first film role, Dalglish said: “First and last, might as well get them both in at one time. The cast and crew have been patient with me because it’s not something I feel too confident with, having to learn lines and speak lines but the good thing is they allow you to have a bit of licence yourself and use words I am more accustomed to using than what is in the script”.

Director Ellen Perry also changed the script to help a “shy” Gerrard film his scene set just before the final.

She said: “I could tell he was really getting uptight and I said to him: ’Come on man, think about where you’re at, it’s the biggest match of your career, this is nothing’ and he leaned in and said: ’But I’ve been kicking a ball since I was six”’.

The Los Angeles-based filmmaker said the “underdog story” was originally written without a specific club in mind but she fell “completely in love” with Liverpool.

She said: “You couldn’t script that match...it’s epic. Talk about the underdog, so that’s what I mean when I say it chose us and 'You’ll Never Walk Alone' too.

“It’s Rodgers and Hammerstein from Carousel, they’ve taken it on as their own, they’ve just sealed it to their hearts and it’s what the film is about.”

The film stars 12-year-old Perry Eggleton from Peacehaven, East Sussex, in the lead role along with Damian Lewis and Bob Hoskins, but one group of people who do not feature are the defeated Italians who would not allow the filmmakers to show the club’s badge, scarves or strips.

Perry joked: “They’re still really p***ed off”.

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