Less than a third of people want TV licence scrapped, study finds

Less than a third of people want the TV licence scrapped, according to a study into the public’s attitude towards the BBC.

Just 29% of those surveyed backed binning the charge ahead of a new BBC Royal Charter coming into force next year.

The research also found less than half of the people who took part know how much the licence costs, while 8% said they did not pay the fee at all.

The study, carried out by research firm Strategy Analytics, asked 1,023 people how they felt about the BBC, with 71% replying they were satisfied with the service provided.

It found older and affluent members of the public were more positive towards the broadcaster and that the average amount people were willing to pay was £101.57 – 30% lower than the actual price of £145.50.

The study found people were split over new rules which came into force in September, meaning viewers must have a TV licence to watch BBC programmes on iPlayer.

A total of 47% disagreed with the loophole being closed, while 40% said the move was correct.

David Mercer, from Strategy Analytics, said the research shows the BBC “struggles to identify with younger and lower income groups”.

He added those were the people who “tend to be most resistant to the idea of a licence fee”.

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