Kylie Jenner using ‘snap back’ waist-trainer after giving birth

Kylie Jenner using ‘snap back’ waist-trainer after giving birth

Kylie Jenner has revealed she is using a waist-trainer to get back in shape after giving birth to her first baby.

The US reality TV star, 20, welcomed daughter Stormi in February.

She posted a picture on Instagram showing her waist cinched into a black corset, which she said was of the “snap back” package.

She wrote: “my girl @premadonna87 hooked me up with the @waistgangsociety snap back package. #ad waistgang has the BEST quality snap back products.

“make sure you get your package & follow @waistgangsociety to join & keep up the journey together.”

Jenner is not the only member of her famous family who is a fan of the tummy-toning technique.

Both Kim and Khloe Kardashian have shared photos showing them using waist-trainers in the past.

Kourtney Kardashian was also pictured in one of the belts after having her third child.

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