Kidman blasted over didgeridoo stunt

Kidman blasted over didgeridoo stunt

Nicole Kidman has enraged Aboriginal leaders in her native Australia by breaking a centuries-old taboo against women playing the didgeridoo.

The actress was seen blowing into the wooden instrument on a German TV chatshow last Saturday.

And several cultural leaders have now criticised her for the stunt, because tradition dictates that only men should play the didgeridoo.

One critic has even suggested Kidman's fertility could be at risk after she broke the ancient rule.

Aboriginal actor and language teacher Richard Green says: "People are going to see Nicole playing it and think it's all right. It bastardises our culture.

"I will guarantee she has no more children. It is not meant to be played by women as it will make them barren."

And Alan Madden, a cultural officer at Sydney's Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council, adds: "I presume she doesn't know, otherwise she wouldn't be playing it."

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