Ireland's favourite folk song revealed

Ireland's favourite folk song revealed

The winner of Ireland’s Favourite Folk Song has been revealed.

On Raglan Road, written by Patrick Kavanagh and made famous by singer Luke Kelly, was named as Ireland's most iconic folk song.

The song was performed live on The Late Late Show by Luka Bloom tonight.

The Ireland’s Favourite Folk Song series was presented by folk legend Mary Black, who said: “I’m delighted to hear that the public voted for the wonderful On Raglan Road as Ireland’s favorite folk song. It’s always been a favourite of mine and deserves this great accolade!”

Impressionist and Monaghan native Oliver Callan, who had championed On Raglan Road as part of the television series, spoke about the announcement on the Late Late Show.

On Raglan Road began life in the 1940s as a lyric poem written by Patrick Kavanagh following his infatuation with Hilda Moriarty, a young medical student from Dingle.

Kavanagh befriended Hilda in 1944 when they both lived on Raglan Road. The poem that would eventually become On Raglan Road was first published in The Irish Press in 1946 as Dark-haired Miriam Ran Away.

Kavanagh died before he could hear his lyric recorded. Luke Kelly eventually recorded the song with The Dubliners in 1971. It was included on their live album Hometown in 1972 and has remained a firm favourite with Irish people since.

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