Indian film wins battle against Harry Potter suit

Boy wizard Harry Potter has finally been defeated, by an Indian soundalike called Hari Puttar.

A film called 'Hari Puttar – A Comedy of Terrors' is set to hit cinemas this week after an Indian court rejected a legal attempt to ban it by Warner Brothers who claimed the name was too close to the JK Rowling creation.

The court said in its ruling that people who have watched the Harry Potter films and read the books would know the difference between that and the Punjabi film.

The producers, Mirchi Movies, said the Puttar movie bore no resemblance to the famous franchise. Hari is a common name in India and Hindi for God, while “puttar” is Punjabi for son.

“It’s clearly great to have won this case,” Munish Purii, Mirchi’s chief executive said today. “We are hoping for a good release although the timing of the Warner case distracted us from marketing.”

A Warner spokeswoman said the company was reviewing the judgement.

“We brought these proceedings because we believe that the proposed title and marketing of the defendants’ film infringed our intellectual property rights,” she said.

She added that the Hari Puttar producers wanted to “confuse consumers and benefit from the well-known and well-loved Harry Potter brand.”

“Hari Puttar” is not a tale of magic, but the story of an Indian boy and his cousin forgotten at home in Britain where his family has recently moved – in a plot more reminiscent of the film “Home Alone.”

In the Indian film, 10-year-old Hari Puttar must guard his scientist father’s top security computer chip from bumbling burglars, while his parents are away.

Mr Purii said “Hari Puttar” would be released across India on Friday and globally next month.

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