Gogglebox had viewers playing along with a spelling bee and reading lips (with mixed success!)

Gogglebox Ireland had viewers doubting their own spelling ability (or lack thereof) on TV3 this evening.

The Goggleboxers were in a mood for TV games, playing along with a spelling bee and a ‘Read my Lips’ competition.

There was more debate about the Sky 1 spelling bee, in particular the correct spelling of marmalade...

The gang also joined in with Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway on TV3, although the Tully twins from Cavan were less impressed with that duo. “Anto and Dec are a bit like you and me Neal, except we are better looking,” said Fergal.

However, it was a ‘Read my Lips’ game, featuring Brendan O’Carroll in character as Mrs Brown, which took most of the attention.

People also enjoyed the reactions to the now famous drive-thru ashes.

The Ash Wednesday service for commuters in Glenamaddy, Co. Galway, which was covered on the RTÉ News, provoked plenty of comment on the priest’s ‘crossing’ skills.

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