'Generous' George Michael donated huge sums to charities

Behind the headlines and huge on-stage persona, George Michael was a generous man who kept quiet about his considerable charitable donations, it has emerged.

The star – who has died at the age of 53 – donated royalties from some of his biggest selling singles and is said to have given a game show contestant thousands of pounds to fund her IVF treatment.

Michael has helped countless children as a result of his donations to Childline and also supported other organisations including the Terrence Higgins Trust and Macmillan Cancer Support.

Michael, who spoke about losing his partner Anselmo Feleppa to HIV, “personally supported” the Terrence Higgins Trust for “many years”, Jane Barron from the organisation said.

“We are so saddened by the loss of George Michael,” she added.

“George also often thought of us to kindly donate experiences and gifts that were used to raise vital funds to help us support people living with HIV.

“Along with other charities, we were grateful to benefit from the royalties of George’s 1991 duet with Elton John, Don’t Let The Sun Go Down On Me.

“His donations contributed to a vision of a world where people living with HIV live healthy lives free from prejudice and discrimination.

“Thanks to George’s legacy, we are a step closer to that world and we are so grateful for his support and friendship over the years.

“Our thoughts are with his family and loved ones at this difficult time.”

Childline founder and president Dame Esther Rantzen revealed to the Press Association that his generosity also extended to other causes.

“For years now he has been the most extraordinarily generous philanthropist, giving money to Childline, but he was determined not to make his generosity public so no-one outside the charity knew how much he gave to the nation’s most vulnerable children,” she said.

“Over the years he gave us millions and we were planning next year, as part of our 30th anniversary celebrations, to create, we hoped, a big concert in tribute to him – to his artistry, to his wonderful musicality but also to thank him for the hundreds of thousands of children he helped through supporting Childline.

“And it is particularly tragic that Christmas, which was when he released Jesus To A Child, would also be the time when we lost him.

“I think all of us have memories of particular Wham! songs and George Michael songs which mean a great deal to us.

“Certainly, for Britain’s children, George Michael meant so much more.”

More on this topic

George Michael's partner: I found him lying peacefully in bed

George Michael's death at 53 from 'heart failure' shocks friends and fansGeorge Michael's death at 53 from 'heart failure' shocks friends and fans

George Michael: The story of how Wham! made music history by playing in China

George Michael was in demand for TV appearancesGeorge Michael was in demand for TV appearances

More in this Section

Robbie Williams reveals he will be voting for the first timeRobbie Williams reveals he will be voting for the first time

Lily Allen reacts emotionally to Labour manifestoLily Allen reacts emotionally to Labour manifesto

Liam Gallagher reaches out to woman injured by flare at concertLiam Gallagher reaches out to woman injured by flare at concert

Anya Taylor-Joy appears as Jane Austen heroine in first Emma teaser trailerAnya Taylor-Joy appears as Jane Austen heroine in first Emma teaser trailer


Lifestyle

This truck serves as an excellent metaphor for what needs to happen in our education system. A colossal truck needs to barge in front of it.Secret Diary of an Irish Teacher: Time to ditch private schools

Sorting out Cork people for ages...Ask Audrey: Is it still ok to just lob the gob after 10 pints?

Nip those winter ailments in the bud with the help of garden bounty. Fiann Ó Nualláin shows you how.Have a berry merry Christmas with the help of garden bounty

Dig a planting hole around three times the size of its pot and around the same depth, loosening the soil around the hole.Your quick guide to planting trees

More From The Irish Examiner