Free online taster for Banville fans

Free online taster for Banville fans

Fans of Booker Prize winner John Banville can today read the first chapter of his forthcoming novel for free.

The Irish novelist’s new book, 'The Sinking City', is available to view online on a new literary journal launched by the University of Manchester.

The eagerly awaited novel is the author’s first literary fiction since 'The Sea' which won the Man Booker Prize in 2005.

Banville admirers will be able to read the chapter for free by visiting the journal’s website at www.themanchesterreview.co.uk.

'The Manchester Review' is published by the University’s Centre for New Writing, home to Professor of Creative Writing Martin Amis.

Banville was among a number of leading writers who visited the university this year to hold Q&As with students on its MA in Creating Writing course.

In addition to the Banville extract, the journal’s first issue will feature new work by high-profile writers Ali Smith, Paul Muldoon, M.J. Hyland and Bill Manhire.

New issues will appear each spring and autumn offering a mix of new music, public debate, visual art and video as well as fiction and poetry.

Centre for New Writing co-director John McAuliffe said: “Manchester and The University of Manchester were home to some of the UK’s most innovative 20th century literary journals, including Brian Cox’s 'Critical Quarterly' and Michael Schmidt’s 'PN Review'.

“'The Manchester Review' takes its cue from their proactive promotion of new writing, but uses online media to show and sponsor the interplay of poetry, fiction, music, visual art and essays by new and established practitioners.

“We hope that it will find new readers and audiences for exciting and innovative creative work, which is steeped in traditional virtues.

“This will be accompanied by the Review’s lively critical blog, which will take the temperature of – and maybe sometimes set the agenda for – the contemporary arts in the UK and beyond.”

More in this Section

Karla Souza: I know what it’s like not to be represented on screenKarla Souza: I know what it’s like not to be represented on screen

Brooklyn 99 star calls on actors who play police officers to donate to bail fundBrooklyn 99 star calls on actors who play police officers to donate to bail fund

Two-metre poles and temperature checks being used to film EmmerdaleTwo-metre poles and temperature checks being used to film Emmerdale

HelloFresh ends partnership with Glee star Lea MicheleHelloFresh ends partnership with Glee star Lea Michele


Lifestyle

Kim Sheehan is an opera singer from Crosshaven, Co Cork, and is this year’s recipient of the Jane Anne Rothwell Award from Cork Midsummer Festival.A Question of Taste: Cork opera singer, Kim Sheehan

Developed in Ireland by Dublin-based indie gaming house Dreamfeel, If Found follows university graduate Kasio as she returns to Achill, Co Mayo, from the big city.'If Found': a nice discovery for the Irish video-game scene

B-Side the Leeside: Cork's Greatest Records - Giordaí Ua Laoghaire tells Don O’Mahony about the offbeat outfit who created some of the most innovative music on the Irish scene in the 1990sB-Side the Leeside: Nine Wassies from Bainne - A quirky slice of creativity

More time indoors is a chance to consider how we buy for our homes without being slaves to fleeting trends, writes Carol O’CallaghanMore time at home offers a chance to consider how we buy for our interiors

More From The Irish Examiner