Elbow frontman Garvey working on first solo record

Elbow frontman Garvey working on first solo record
Guy Garvey

Guy Garvey is working on his debut solo album.

The Elbow frontman will step away from the band to work on his own offering but warned that it could be a disaster.

He told Gigwise: "[It will] either be great, and a right laugh, or a disaster, and a right laugh".

However, it won't be an entirely solo endeavour as Guy - who will record at Peter Gabriel's Real World Studios - will ask some of his famous friends to collaborate with him on the project.

He explained: "I don't like the term 'solo project', because ... I'll be inviting friends to play on it and will let the [project name] itself as it progresses."

While Guy says this is not the end for Elbow and even explained: "I'm already working on lyrics for the next Elbow record," he is excited about doing his own thing away from the band.

He added: "I love being in the honest and even-handed democracy that is Elbow, but I fancy being the boss for a bit, so I'm going to do a side-project."

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