Caine: Why I may quit acting

Michael Caine has revealed that he plans to retire from acting if he is not offered any more good films.

The 76-year-old actor stars as a retired magician, Clarence, who befriends a young boy whose parents run a retirement home in new British film 'Is Anybody There?'.

Caine revealed: “I’ve just finished a film called 'Harry Brown' and between that and this I didn’t work for 18 months so you get the impression because this has come out and then I’m talking about 'Harry Brown', you think: ’Boy, he’s making films the whole time’.

"I didn’t make a film for 18 months because quite truthfully I didn’t see a script that I wanted to do for 18 moths until 'Harry Brown' came along.

“And now I don’t have a script to do. I have a very small part in Christopher Nolan’s 'Inception', but that’s just a friendship between he and I, it’s just a couple of days.

“I’m talking about a proper movie that I’m in – I don’t have one. And if one doesn’t come along that I want to do. I will be gone. I will be retired. So that’s how it is with me now.”

'Is Anybody There?', which co-stars David Morrissey, Anne-Marie Duff, Bill Millner and Leslie Philips sees Caine’s character slowly develop dementia.

Caine said: “I obviously brought a lot of experience of what it was to suffer from dementia because Dougie Hayward was one of my closest friends and he died while we were making the film.

“I hadn’t really thought of it because it’s not a film about a guy with dementia, it’s just a film about an old magician and a little boy and in the end he does die with dementia. And I didn’t think about it honestly, until I really came to it, and then it struck me.

"I’d been four years, five years with it, not day in day out like a relation but just waiting to walk in and Dougie to ask me who I was, and then one day he did. And that’s as accurate a portrayal of dementia I could do from extreme close-up experience.”

The star of 'The Italian Job', 'Alfie' and 'Zulu' has made over 100 films but is most proud of this latest performance.

He said: “I’ve read many scripts that have made me laugh, and this one made me laugh, but I’ve never read a script before that made me cry, and this one made me cry and that’s why I did it.

“It’s the best I’ve ever done myself. That doesn’t mean a lot of other actors couldn’t do it better, but it’s the best I could do it and I’m sort of happy that I could have got there with such a difficult part.”

Asked if making the film had raised the question of whether there was life after death Caine said: “I’d dearly love to think that there is somebody there.

“And I’ve got a lot of back up because my father was a Catholic, my mother was a Protestant, I was educated by Jews and I’m married to a Muslim. So I won’t lose out on a technicality.”

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