BBC newsreader condemned over mouse killing 'jokes'

A BBC newsreader has been criticised for appearing to joke about his colleague stamping on and killing a mouse.

James Kelly, a Radio 2 journalist and newsreader, took snaps of the “little fella”, who he dubbed “newsmouse”, on the carpeted floor at New Broadcasting House.

He later updated his followers:

A follower was unhappy – but James said that he “didn’t approve” but “it was quicker than a trap or poison…”

Animal charity RSPCA called the incident “shocking”.

“Most healthy mice would run away fast from a person so it may be that this poor creature was sick or injured, but that doesn’t take away from the fact that it is a horrible thing to do to a defenceless rodent,” it said in a statement.

People For The Ethical Treatment Of Animals (Peta) said stamping on a mouse was “hideously cruel” and urged “the authorities to investigate and the BBC to inform all its staff and contractors about what constitutes cruelty – and why small animals are not exempt.”

Staff complained that New Broadcasting House had a mouse problem just weeks after moving into the building in 2013.

More in this Section

Acclaimed animator who created Roger Rabbit dies aged 86Acclaimed animator who created Roger Rabbit dies aged 86

Madonna marks 61st birthday with three nights of celebrationMadonna marks 61st birthday with three nights of celebration

Peter Fonda: the actor who defined counterculture on screenPeter Fonda: the actor who defined counterculture on screen

Jane Fonda leads tributes to brother Peter after his death aged 79Jane Fonda leads tributes to brother Peter after his death aged 79


Lifestyle

Incarcerated in Auschwitz and other Nazi death camps Zuzana Ruzickova somehow survived and went on to create the complete recordings of her beloved Bach, writes James Lawless.Book review: Nazi horrors replaced by brutal Soviets for piano player

The Menu was delighted to make recent mention of a new UCC postgraduate diploma in Irish food culture and is equally pleased to announce availability of two new bursaries for same.The Menu: Food news with Joe McNamee

Milky skincare ingredients keep skin fresh and often suit the whole family, it’s moo-vellous, writes Rachel Marie Walsh.Product watch: Milky skincare ingredients for the whole family

George Orwell’s classic novel foretold a lot, but the manner in which we’ve handed over our personal data to faceless corporatocracies is doubleplus-ungood, says Suzanne Harrington.How we sleepwalked into George Orwell’s nightmarish vision

More From The Irish Examiner