Actor Pat Laffan, who played Georgie Burgess and Pat Mustard, has died

Actor Pat Laffan, who played Georgie Burgess and Pat Mustard, has died

Irish actor Pat Laffan, who played Georgie Burgess in The Snapper and Pat Mustard in Father Ted, has died aged 79.

Laffan was best known for his portrayal of Craggy Island’s smooth-talking milkman in the Channel 4 sitcom.

He also appeared in almost 40 films and made 30 television appearances.

Laffan appeared in almost 40 films (Niall Carson/PA)
Laffan appeared in almost 40 films (Niall Carson/PA)

A statement from his representative said: “It is with tremendous sadness that we here at the Lisa Richards Agency can confirm Pat Laffan’s passing today.

“Pat was one of the very first clients of the agency but much more than that, he was a close friend, a mentor and a hugely important supporter of the company’s founders Lisa and Richard Cook and for many of the staff of the agency who had the pleasure to represent and work with him over the last almost thirty years.”

It continued: “All here will remember him first and foremost as our friend and mentor and we will miss him terribly. We send our heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.”

Laffan was a member of the Abbey Theatre Company throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

He took up the role of director at the Peacock Theatre, and directed in the Gate Theatre between 1979 and 1982.

He also appeared in the BBC sitcom EastEnders and in the RTE medical drama The Clinic.

The Abbey tweeted: "Very sad to hear that Pat Laffan has passed away. His career at the Abbey started in 1961 and spanned five decades. He will be sorely missed. He is pictured (centre) in one of his earliest appearances here in The Enemy Within in 1962."

The Gate Theatre also paid tribute, saying: "Over the years, Pat was an incredible force in the Irish theatre community and was no stranger to the Gate throughout his prolific career as an actor and director. Our thoughts are with his family and friends."

Father Ted creator Graham Linehan tweeted: "Just heard the sad news that Pat Laffan who played Pat Mustard in Father Ted has died. Rest in peace, Pat, a pleasure to work with you."

The Gaiety School of Acting said in a statement: "It is with great sadness that we learn of the passing today of our board member, the respected actor Pat Laffan. The director, founder, board, staff and students of the Gaiety School of Acting express their sincere sympathies to Pat’s family and friends.

"Pat was a former member of the Abbey Theatre Company in the 60s and 70s and Director of the Peacock Theatre in the 1970’s. He also directed in the Gate Theatre from 1979 to 1982. Pat will be remembered for his performances in films such as Warhorse, The Queen, Intermission, The Snapper and The General, and on television in The Clinic, Eastenders and Father Ted.

"Thank you Pat for playing such an important role within the GSA for many years, for the myriad memorable performances across stage and screen, and for being a great friend to the School.

"Ar dheis Dé go raibh a h’anam. May he rest in peace."

PA & Digital Desk


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