You’ll soon be able to sip a cocktail on top of an Icelandic glacier

You’ll soon be able to sip a cocktail on top of an Icelandic glacier

If you thought drinking a cocktail at an ice bar was a novelty, just wait until you see this spot opening on top of a glacier.

In October, for five days only, the Reyka Bar will set up shop on one of Iceland’s biggest glaciers. The adventurous pub will be serving cocktails made with Reyka vodka, which seems particularly appropriate considering the liquor has its water source on the glacier.

What the bar is expected to look like when it opens (Reyka/PA)
What the bar is expected to look like when it opens (Reyka/PA)

Sure, it’s not exactly going to become your local bar – it’s located on the Langjökull glacier in Iceland, which is the second-largest glacier in the country – however, it’s still pretty spectacular.

The Reyka vodka process is powered by renewable energy and distilled in small batches, while the glacial spring water used runs through a 4,000-year-old lava field, and is distilled in the coastal village of Borgarnes.

When you’re not drinking vodka at the bar, there’s plenty to do on Langjökull. Not only is the scenery breathtaking, but the glacier is full of ice tunnels to explore. There’s also plenty of experiences for thrillseekers, from snowmobiling over the glacier to travelling in monster trucks.

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#iceland #intotheglacier #landjökull

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Just having an absolute blast in Iceland 😍🇮🇸

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The melting glacier also creates some of the most gorgeous waterfalls in the surrounding area, including Hraunfossar and Gullfoss. If you want to relax after a day of adventuring, head to the hot springs in the nearby Borgarfjörður valley, which are also around thanks to the glacier.

Tour companies run trips out to Langjökull from the country’s capital, Reykjavik.

And what better way to see it than with a drink in hand? Sign up here if you want the chance to visit the glacier bar between October 16 and October 20.

- Press Association

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