Shocking images of the amount of plastic left behind after Metallica gig

Shocking images of the amount of plastic left behind after Metallica gig

Images of the shocking amount of plastic waste left behind at Slane Castle over the weekend have surfaced on the internet.

75,000 people travelled to the Meath venue as Metallica played their first Irish show in a decade and with the excitement came thousands of plastic glasses, plastic bags, rain ponchos - all which were left behind.

My Waste Ireland took to Twitter to share photos they were sent of the aftermath and their concern coming up to festival season.

“We were sent these images of the aftermath and are in shock,” they captioned the photos.

This needs to stop, a deposit refund scheme needs to be put in place at all large, outdoor events

Twitter user, Dave replied to the tweet to ensure them that the litter has been since cleared

The waste management account went on to say that even though it’s gone, it won’t be forgotten.

“Local authorities should have a deposit refund scheme in the permit, it may not solve the problem completely but it would show that they are being proactive rather than reactive”

They were then asked if they knew what happened ‘with it all’ to which they replied:

It would all have been sent for incineration as the material would have a high calorific value

Last year, bulldozers were used to clear up thousands of leftover tents and waste left at Electric Picnic in Stradbally.

One shocking video, shot by Ed Rice, shows two bulldozers trudging through the Oscar Wilde campsite gathering the waste, which was then transferred straight to a landfill site.


It is estimated that more than 588 tonnes of waste, which included beer cans, food wrappers, chairs, inflatable mattresses, clothing – including shoes and coats - went into a landfill/incinerator after the Picnic.

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