Kerry politician invites Garth Brooks to perform in Killarney

Kerry politician invites Garth Brooks to perform in Killarney

A Kerry politician is inviting Garth Brooks to perform in Killarney.

It follows the release of a Netflix documentary that shows the country music superstar singing a song with his late mother that references the town.

Garth Brooks and his mother Colleen Carroll together singing 'The Irish Lullaby' which is featured in the Netflix documentary about his life called 'The Road I'm On'.

The county superstar says how much the song, which references Killarney, meant to both of them.

After watching the documentary, Killarney councillor Niall 'Botty' O'Callaghan got the idea to invite Garth Brooks to perform in the town.

The independent councillor says the music icon could play in Fitzgerald Stadium, which previously hosted acts such as Elton John, Bryan Adams and Westlife, for as many nights as he wants.

Cllr O'Callaghan says Killarney would treat Garth Brooks much better than Dublin where five planned concerts for Croke Park were cancelled following a row over licensing.

“They don’t want Garth Brooks in Dublin, we’d love to have him in the Fitzgerald Stadium in Killarney for a week or two weeks,” said Mr O’Callaghan.

“He can come down and play as much as he wants and he can have an emotional connection with his mom. We’d love to have him.”

Previously, Brooks said cancelling the Dublin shows was "probably the saddest moment of my musical career".

He told a fan at the Country Music Association Fest in 2018: "That [the cancellations] happened probably after the coolest moment in my musical career - selling 400,000 tickets in one city, that's very sweet. To have to refund 400,00 tickets broke my heart."

“Not being allowed to play all five, I had to pick two of the five to cancel and I said 'screw that, I'm not going to do that to those people.'

“It was either all or none, when it became none, it was like 'come over here’ and I've been lucky to see the Irish flag at just about every concert that we do and I so thank them for making the miles over here and hope its worth it."

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