US concerns reportedly raised over Huawei involvement in 5G network

US concerns reportedly raised over Huawei involvement in 5G network

Washington has stepped-up efforts to try and prevent Downing Street from backing Chinese technology firm Huawei’s involvement in the 5G communications network, it has been reported.

Senior US officials presented the British Government with information to persuade it not to allow the Chinese tech firm to get a lucrative foothold in the UK market, according to the Financial Times.

The newspaper said technical information was put forward in a meeting between US and British security officials on Monday.

The FT said there were growing expectations that Prime Minister Boris  Johnson would decide in favour of allowing the use of Huawei equipment in some “non-core” parts of the network, with a final decision due later in January.

Huawei argues it is a private firm – in no meaningful sense is that correct

It comes after Tory MP Bob Seely called for the Foreign Affairs Committee to open an immediate investigation into Huawei’s suitability for use in Britain’s 5G network.

Bob Seely said Huawei “to all intents and purposes is part of the Chinese state” and a deal with the tech giant would allow Beijing to access the UK’s network.

Mr Seely, who sat on the Foreign Affairs Committee in the last Parliament, added that it is “an extraordinarily important issue” on which the Government should be listening to the US and Australia.

He told MPs during the Queen’s Speech debate that Huawei is “the subject of US investigation for fraud and commercial espionage”.

US officials presented the Government with information to persuade it not to allow Huawei  to get a foothold in the UK market, it is reported (PA)
US officials presented the Government with information to persuade it not to allow Huawei to get a foothold in the UK market, it is reported (PA)

Mr Seely continued: “Sadly I feel that the debate over Huawei is marked by dangerous levels of misunderstanding and sometimes disinformation.

“For example, Huawei argues it is a private firm – in no meaningful sense is that correct.

“Huawei, to all intents and purposes, is part of the Chinese state and allowing Huawei a role in the 5G network is effectively to allow China and its agencies access to our network, and to say otherwise is simply false.”

Foreign Office minister Andrew Stephenson said a final decision will be “taken in due course”, adding: “The Government will consider the full range of risks when making this decision.”

More on this topic

Huawei: US ban is still unfairHuawei: US ban is still unfair

Huawei Mate 30: challenging convention and delivering unrivalled user experienceHuawei Mate 30: challenging convention and delivering unrivalled user experience

Huawei Mate 30 pro’s stop five featuresHuawei Mate 30 pro’s stop five features

Estonia to restrict government use of Huawei 5G technologyEstonia to restrict government use of Huawei 5G technology

More in this Section

Sajid Javid issues post-Brexit warning to business leadersSajid Javid issues post-Brexit warning to business leaders

Markets jump despite fresh US-China concernsMarkets jump despite fresh US-China concerns

Alexa privacy fears prompt action from EU data chiefAlexa privacy fears prompt action from EU data chief

Wicklow County Council puts brakes on Seán FitzPatrick's Greystones house-build planWicklow County Council puts brakes on Seán FitzPatrick's Greystones house-build plan


Lifestyle

The actor knows how to impress when it comes to high profile events.6 times Katie Holmes wowed on the red carpet

Glamour, fun and feathers all feature in this year’s hottest looks – but first and foremost, individual style rules.10 on-trend ways to transform your home in 2020

Abi Jackson shares the enduring appeal of Pooh Bear’s wisdom on Winnie-the-Pooh Day – author A.A. Milne’s birthday.Winnie-the-Pooh Day: The wellbeing lessons we can learn from Pooh Bear

We asked three experts for the low-down on shampooing frequency.How often should you really wash your hair?

More From The Irish Examiner