This year's Web Summit 'could be last held in Ireland'

This year's Web Summit 'could be last held in Ireland'

Around 30,000 people are expected to attend Web Summit in Dublin this November - but it could be the last held in Ireland.

More than 2,000 start-ups will exhibit at Web Summit this year, with author Dan Brown, Tour de France winner Chris Froome and the founders of Tinder and Instagram just some of the speakers already announced.

With more than 1,000 investors present, the event could be worth more than €100m to the Irish economy.

However, Web Summit chief executive Paddy Cosgrave said that they have been approached by other cities.

"I would say, very openly, that since the very first event that we held in Ireland, we've been approached," he said.

"I mean in 2011, we held a number of meetings in number 10 Downing Street, and a number of countries and cities that have become involved in the Web Summit has grown substantially in the last number of years."

Cosgrave previously warned he would pull the event out of Ireland unless the wi-fi problems which have dogged the event in Dublin are resolved.

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