Taiwan eases export ban

Taiwan's government says it will allow the export of hundreds of strategic high-tech goods to China if exporters can prove that North Korea or Iran will not be their final destinations.

The list of proscribed China shipments was introduced in 2006 amid concerns that Iran and North Korea might use Taiwan as a trans-shipment point for goods and materials that could be used to produce weapons of mass destruction.

The Economics Ministry said radar, optical equipment, astronomical instruments and precision machine tools were among nearly 400 items that would now be allowed for China export.

Twelve items related to semi-conductor manufacturing equipment will remain on the proscribed list, carrying a five-year jail sentence.

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