Survey finds 40% of managerial roles in Ireland filled by women

Survey finds 40% of managerial roles in Ireland filled by women

A survey from Eurostat has found that two out of five managers in Ireland are female.

However, their survey also found that the number drops for the European Union, where out of nearly 9.4 million people in managerial positions, six million are men (64%) and 3.4 million are women (36%).

In Ireland - 41% of managers are female, but when it comes to senior executives in Ireland there are just 16% that are female

Also, just 19% of Boards in Ireland are made up of women.

In the EU, women account for 27% of board members of publicly listed companies and for 17% of senior executives in 2018.

Ireland South MEP, Deirdre Clune, said: “As we celebrate International Women’s Day on Friday around the world, figures show that women remain underrepresented in the business and political world. We have to continue to do all we can to support women across all aspects of society.

"Be it a woman who wants to return to work after having children or a woman who would like to embark on a political career - it is vital that supports are in place to ensure women can make this happen.

“We are working hard at EU level at the European Parliament to bring in measures to ensure people are entitled to things like flexible working conditions which will go a long way to helping women advance in their careers. Earlier this year the European Parliament and the Council reached a deal on a Work/Life Balance Package. The aim of the measures is to help workers balance their professional and family lives and to work towards a modern family policy and economic prosperity for families all around Europe.

“Work/Life balance is an issue which concerns many people in the workforce and it needs to be tackled with concrete policy measures both in Europe and in Ireland."

"The workplace can be an exciting and exhilarating place. However, it can also be a challenging place. What many people will struggle with is getting their work/life balance right.

“In Ireland, the Government is doing a lot of work on the issues with legislation to extend unpaid parental leave from 18 weeks to 26 weeks for all parents with children under eight years and also measures to help parents financially with young children.”

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