Software firm announces 100 jobs in plan to move global HQ from UK to Dublin

Software firm announces 100 jobs in plan to move global HQ from UK to Dublin

Software firm, Aptiv, has announced that it will relocate its global headquarters to Dublin from the United Kingdom.

The move means the creation of 100 jobs by the end of the year on top of the 150 people they currently employ in Dublin.

Aptiv’s global headquarters will employ hundreds of professionals in information technology, supply chain management and finance.

The company said Ireland’s favourable regulatory environment, Dublin’s continued growth as a vibrant technology hub, access to top universities and the city’s public infrastructure were important factors in their move.

Kevin Clark, president and chief executive officer of Aptiv, said: “With Ireland’s strong pro-business environment, Dublin’s talented workforce, and strong partners in government and the private and academic sectors, this vibrant city is one of the most attractive and appealing locations in which to operate.

“As a result, Dublin is the right choice for our global headquarters. We look forward to becoming an employer and partner of choice in Ireland.”

IDA Ireland CEO Martin Shanahan said: “Aptiv’s decision to locate its strategically important global headquarters in Dublin is an excellent endorsement of Ireland's attractiveness for high quality foreign direct investment.

"The company is building a strong team of professionals to drive its business from Ireland.”

The company develops active safety systems, electrical architecture, connected services and software necessary for automated driving.

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