Shares hit five-year low in Japan

Japanese shares dropped to their lowest level in almost five years amid growing fears over the widening financial crisis.

The benchmark Nikkei 225 index lost 317.90 points, or 3.03%, to close at 10,155.90 today – its lowest finish since December 2003.

At one point the index tumbled more than 5% to 9,916.21 in the morning session, dropping below the psychologically key 10,000 level for the first time in almost five years. It recovered later in the day.

The broader Topix index also lost 2.15% to 977.61 today.

Car-makers were among the biggest losers.

Mitsubishi Motors was down 10.3% to 131 yen. Nissan fell 4.79% to 556 yen, and Toyota dropped 4.87% to 3,710 yen.

More on this topic

World markets follow US plunge

Slump in world markets continues

Rolls-Royce to axe up to 2,000 jobs

IMF approves Iceland support scheme

More in this Section

ESRI warns Government against an early cut to Covid-19 pandemic payments as economy slumpsESRI warns Government against an early cut to Covid-19 pandemic payments as economy slumps

Lufthansa bailout 'in Europe's best interests'Lufthansa bailout 'in Europe's best interests'

Commercial landlord Hibernia Reit sees city centre office demand outpacing Covid-19 'speed-bump'Commercial landlord Hibernia Reit sees city centre office demand outpacing Covid-19 'speed-bump'

EU says it now has €1.85trn firepower to fight Covid-19 economic devastation across the continentEU says it now has €1.85trn firepower to fight Covid-19 economic devastation across the continent


Lifestyle

Cork author Conal Creedon tells Richard Fitzpatrick about some of his influences, from characters in his family’s shop to Ian Dury and Jim JarmuschCulture That Made Me: Conal Creedon on showbands, punk rock and playing the saw

A new thriller on Netflix is already causing a stir, and JK Rowling has set the internet alight with chapters of her fairytale, writes Des O’DriscollOnline Entertainment Tips: Snowpiercer, JK Rowling's new tale, and two films on Repeal

She's been sorting out Cork people for ages likeAsk Audrey: Normal People is basically a Maeve Binchy novel with mobile phones

Every evening, volunteers set out on bikes from Penny Dinners, delivering food and supplies to Cork’s homeless community. Donal O’Keeffe accompanied the Knight Riders on their rounds.Knight Riders bike around Cork city to deliver food to the homeless for Cork Penny Dinners

More From The Irish Examiner