Shane Lowry’s sports agent Horizon also gets in the profits swing

Shane Lowry’s sports agent Horizon also gets in the profits swing

The Dublin-based sports agency Horizon Sports which represents Shane Lowry had a positive swing in its fortunes last year even before the Clara, Co Offaly man’s runaway victory at the British Open.

The agency is headed by Conor Ridge. It has represented Mr Lowry since he turned pro 10 years ago.

The agency’s other star clients include rugby players Johnny Sexton and Peter O’Mahony.

The most recent accounts for Horizon Sports Management Ltd show that it recorded a positive swing of €93,028 in the 12 months to the end of June in 2018.

However, the agency up until the weekend’s famous victory has been best known for its very public falling out with Rory McIlroy.

In an out-of-court agreement in 2015 in Dublin, Horizon Sports received a reported €21.8m from the golfer.

On Sunday, Mr Ridge was at the 18th green to congratulate Mr Lowry.

On the back of Mr Lowry’s win, Fáilte Ireland is predicting a huge boost to Ireland’s golf tourism industry.

Following on from The Open’s resounding success, a group of top US golf reporters have extended their stay in Ireland to play at other courses as they explore counties Donegal, Sligo, and Monaghan.

Organised by Fáilte Ireland and Tourism Ireland, the agencies say Mr Lowry’s win help showcase some of the best golf courses in the northwest and hidden gems along the Wild Atlantic Way.

Speaking on the importance of hosting key golf media, international publicity executive for Fáilte Ireland Rory Mathews said the 400 golf courses in Ireland already play a big role in generating tourism.

We provide world-class courses, great value for money and fantastic holiday experiences to our international visitors.

“Ireland is famous for having a third of the world’s links courses and our parkland courses have hosted some of the biggest golfing events on the planet, such as the Ryder Cup in 2006,” he said.

He said that the visiting top US golfing reporters will help boost the number of tourists flying into the island to play golf.

“We believe that golf can deliver increasing numbers of tourists into Ireland and we will ensure this happens by concentrating on developing relationships with key golf media,” Mr Mathews said.

Annually more than 200,000 overseas visitors play golf which contributes almost €270m to the economy and accounts for over 1.7 million bed nights, according to Fáilte Ireland.

The tourism body said that more visitors from the US will likely choose Ireland for a golfing holiday.

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