SFA welcomes CSO report

The Small Firms Association (SFA) has today welcomed the publication of the Small Business in Ireland 2008 Report from the CSO.

“The SFA welcomes this report which outlines the position and importance of the small business sector in Ireland,” said assistant SFA director Avine McNally.

“As the report confirms, small firms have been to the forefront of job and wealth creation and are significant contributors to economic growth.

“For over a decade small businesses have been the main source of employment growth and a major vehicle for change.”

“Public policy in regard to the small business sector in Ireland cannot be conducted without the benefit of comprehensive, up-to-date statistical information. The information contained within the report provides a range of indicators relevant to the small business sector.

“This will enable emerging trends to be monitored, key business issues to be identified which will assist in the development of coherent polices and future planning for the sector.

“Small businesses are both different and important. They are important because they create jobs. They are different because they are managed by people who take risks with their own money.”

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