Samsung files lawsuit against Apple

Samsung files lawsuit against Apple

Samsung Electronics said it has filed a second patent lawsuit against Apple in South Korea, alleging infringement of tablet and smartphone technology.

Samsung said today that the lawsuit filed earlier this week in Seoul alleges that Apple's iPhone 4S and iPad 2 infringe three of Samsung's patents.

Samsung's lawsuit comes as Apple unveils its new iPad in the United States this week.

The technology giants are engaged in a legal battle in many countries.

Apple sued Samsung in the United States in April last year and Samsung sued Apple in South Korea in the same month.

Apple claims Samsung's Galaxy tablets and smartphones "slavishly" copied its iPhone and iPad models.

More in this Section

Cork-based delivery franchise seeks to tap online parcels surge     Cork-based delivery franchise seeks to tap online parcels surge

Elizabeth Warren is set to change US policies for business, even if she fails to secure tilt at presidencyElizabeth Warren is set to change US policies for business, even if she fails to secure tilt at presidency

Irish Whiskey wants to turn Brexit on its headIrish Whiskey wants to turn Brexit on its head

Silence may be golden for urban turbine: Yeloblade is developing silent wind turbines that can be installed on any roofSilence may be golden for urban turbine: Yeloblade is developing silent wind turbines that can be installed on any roof


Lifestyle

Five things for the week ahead with Des O'Driscoll.Five things for the week ahead

From Liverpool’s beat-pop to Bristol’s trip-hop, Irish writer Karl Whitney explains the distinctive musical output of individual cities in the UK, writes Marjorie Brennan.Sounds of the City: The musical output of individual UK cities

As landlords’ enclosures of villages and commonages during England’s industrial revolution drove landless countrymen into the maws of the poet William Blake’s “dark Satanic mills”, a romantic nostalgia for the countryside began to grow.Damien Enright: Great writers took inspiration from walking

Take no risks, ‘do all the right things’, and you’ll lead a comfortable, but dull, existence. ‘Living dangerously’, on the other hand, yields ‘highs’ of excitement usually followed, alas, by pain andRichard Collins: Live fast and die young or last up to 500 years

More From The Irish Examiner