Ryanair expects majority of flights to go ahead despite pilot strike

Ryanair expects majority of flights to go ahead despite pilot strike

Ryanair expects the vast majority of its flights to go ahead next week, despite a two-day strike.

The company's directly employed pilots will not work next Thursday and Friday because of a pay row.

It is after talks between the Irish Airlines Pilots Association and the airline broke down yesterday.

Ryanair's Eddie Wilson hopes most of the airline's flights will still go ahead during the strike - like during industrial action last year.

He said: "It's too early to say but like last year we did like over 93% we were able to complete with the cooperation of our crews.

"I think when our crews look at this and see that union in 2019 is looking for a 100% pay increase when they'd already received a 20% pay increase - it's off the charts.

"Unbelievable in the last weekend of August to be threatening our customers with this type of action."

He added: "We have been reasonable throughout this process, and they have abandoned the mediation process."

Meanwhile, Bernard Harbour from the Forsa trade union, which includes the Irish Airline Pilots Association warned Ryanair that more strikes are likely after next week.

"No other dates have been announced, as you know we have to give a weeks notice under the law for any industrial action.

"We regret any inconvenience that Ryanair's attitude is going to cause to the travelling public, but if there isn't a solution to this problem around the negotiation table, there is likely to be further industrial action after next week."

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