Q&A: Cork Airport issues a guide for passengers in the event of a no-deal Brexit

Q&A: Cork Airport issues a guide for passengers in the event of a no-deal Brexit

Cork Airport has published a detailed guide to help passengers understand how their travel plans will be affected in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

From delays, security and even duty-free, Cork Airport is making sure you have all the information you will need before your flight.

Will flights be cancelled or delayed if there is a no deal Brexit?

A no deal Brexit is not expected to have any impact on flight operations at Cork Airport. The EU has introduced new laws to ensure that flights between the UK and Ireland will continue to operate as normal even if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. The UK has confirmed that it will mirror these arrangements.

What queue should UK passport holders use at airport immigration if the UK leaves without a deal?

At present, UK passport holders are processed through the EU channel at Cork Airport. If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the Garda National Immigration Bureau (GNIB), which operates immigration at Cork Airport, has confirmed that UK passport holders will continue to be processed through the EU channel – however, this EU channel will be re-designated as an EU/UK channel. This means there is no real change at Irish immigration for UK passport holders.

In the event of a no deal Brexit, we will be changing the signs at immigration to make things clear for passengers. Cork Airport staff will also be on hand to help passengers to deal with any queries that may arise.

If the UK leaves without a deal, what customs channel should UK arrivals use?

In the event of a no deal Brexit the UK will no longer be in the European Union and ALL passengers arriving from UK airports will have to use the Green customs channel or the Red channel if they need to make a customs declaration.

No passenger arriving from a UK airport is entitled to use the Blue channel post Brexit, irrespective of their nationality. Revenue Commissioners staff who manage Customs at Cork Airport will be on hand to help passengers and to deal with any queries that may arise.

Will duty-free shopping return for passengers flying to the UK in a no deal scenario?

Duty-free shopping will return on alcohol and tobacco products if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. The UK government has said it will reintroduce duty-free for passengers travelling to EU countries in the event of a no deal Brexit. In that context, the Irish government has said duty-free will be available on alcohol and tobacco products for passengers travelling on flights to the UK from Irish airports in the event of a no deal Brexit.

What allowances will people have if duty-free returns on flights to the UK?

The duty-free allowances are likely to be the same as those currently in place for non-EU countries. These are as follows: 200 cigarettes or 100 cigarillos or 50 cigars or 250g of smoking tobacco; 1 litre of spirits; 2 litres of liqueur, port or sherry; 4 litres of wine, and 16 litres of beer.

Q&A: Cork Airport issues a guide for passengers in the event of a no-deal Brexit

Will passengers travelling to the UK from Cork Airport be able to buy duty-free perfume and cosmetics?

No. The Irish Government has said that under a no deal Brexit scenario only duty-free alcohol and tobacco will be available for passengers on flights to the UK. The Loop at Cork Airport will continue to offer Ireland’s best deals for beauty and cosmetics for all passengers, regardless of their final destination, with prices that are at least 15% cheaper than downtown stores.

Will there be any impact with respect to security screening for Irish or UK passengers in a no deal scenario?

No. We’re not expecting any security changes for UK passengers or for any other nationalities travelling to the UK from Cork Airport. UK citizens and those travelling to the UK should continue to comply with all existing security processes and requirements.

What about the Common Travel Area (CTA) between Ireland and the UK, does it still apply?

Both the Irish and British governments have said the Common Travel Area (CTA) will continue to apply. Under the CTA, Irish and UK citizens can move freely and live in either jurisdiction and enjoy associated rights and entitlements.

The Government of Ireland, the UK Government, and the EU have committed to maintaining the CTA and its associated rights and entitlements in all circumstances, including in a no deal Brexit.

Some airlines let me use just a driving licence as ID for flying to Britain, will that change after Brexit? Will I need to have a passport?

The Common Travel Area (CTA) will continue to operate between Ireland and the UK in a no deal Brexit.

However, passengers will still have to present proof of their identity to avail of CTA arrangements and therefore will need official photo identification. Passengers should check with their airline to clarify the type of identification the airline requires and should travel with their passport if there is any uncertainty.

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