Planned 117-room Dublin hotel gets green-light

Planned 117-room Dublin hotel gets green-light

Dublin City Council has approved a €35m development project which will include a new 117-bedroomed hotel for Dublin’s Dawson St.

The project is being led by hotel investment company Tetrarch Capital and will also see the redevelopment of the Royal Irish Automobile Club (RIAC) private members’ club.

“The proposal is welcomed and, given the location of the site and the surrounding context, the proposed scheme is deemed to be acceptable,” said Dublin City Council.

Its report said “the development provides for a modern and stylish contemporary structure in a historic area of the inner city and the proposal forms an active frontage onto Anne’s Lane, which is likely to create footfall and vibrancy in the locality.”

The council said that “broadly the proposal is considered a significant improvement on the existing building and its modern/contemporary design appears to reference the historic fabric of the streetscape, yet is appropriately scaled and designed in its setting”.

It said that the proposed development will provide “a valuable asset for Dublin and accords with both the City Development Plan and the proper planning and sustainable development of the area”.

The project is expected to take two years to complete.

The redevelopment — designed by architects, McCauley Daye O’Connell — is intended to guarantee the long-term future of the club and deliver best-in-class facilities for all members of the RIAC.

The RIAC private members’ club has been in existence since 1901 and provides its members with two restaurants, a bar, a reading room and a substantial library.

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