Option for third runway at Dublin Airport 'on the table', Shane Ross says

Option for third runway at Dublin Airport 'on the table', Shane Ross says

The Minister for Transport Shane Ross says a third terminal at Dublin Airport is still on the table, but he will look for the views of key stakeholders before considering its future.

Another terminal at Dublin Airport would need to be built by 2031 due to growing passenger numbers, according to a review of the Capacity Needs for Ireland’s State Airports.

However, this is disputed by a number of groups such as the Dublin Airport Authority which says other facilities such as a new runway are needed rather than a new terminal.

Interested parties will be able to give their thoughts on the review's findings through a public consultation process, which will be open until the end of the year.

Commenting on today’s publication, Minister Ross said he was acutely aware of the dependence of the national economy on Ireland’s airports, particularly Dublin Airport, and that it is critical to get strategic development decisions right

“I want to ensure that there is an open approach to the policy options for expansion of Dublin Airport and specifically an examination of the merit of introducing competition in the provision of terminal services," he said.

"The Report confirms that this is a possible option. I will now seek to establish the views of key stakeholders before considering the matter further and deciding a way forward.

"Airports are vital to Ireland; aviation supports Ireland’s trading relationships and provides significant employment.

Tourism, Ireland’s largest indigenous industry, relies heavily on air travel. Irish airports, and Dublin Airport in particular, have experienced a strong return to growth in recent years and this growth is expected to continue.

"In order to ensure that the airports are prepared for the longer term, this review looks to the future needs of the three State Airports to 2050,@ he said.

Digital Desk

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