Online shoppers urged to back #GreenFriday

Small artisan craftspeople are joining forces to encourage shoppers to think of buying local during Black Friday.

Kay Lyng, entrepreneur and owner of K Kajoux Jewels in Kilkenny..
Kay Lyng, entrepreneur and owner of K Kajoux Jewels in Kilkenny..

The artisan businesses are encouraging consumers to use the #GreenFriday tag in their social media activities.

Their hope is to gain a little traction on the back of the flood of #blackfriday tweets.

In 2017, Irish Customers spent €16bn in online shopping on this day, 75% of which was on websites outside of Ireland. Even opting for local Irish websites would make a difference.

“It’s a movement to get people to support local Irish-owned businesses,” said Kay Lyng, Irish jewelry designer, entrepreneur and owner of K Kajoux Jewels in Kilkenny.

“We’re hoping some people will rally around #GreenFriday and save small businesses from being completely lost in the busiest commercial week of the year.

Small businesses aren’t in a position to discount to compete with the big corporate entities.

"I decided not to discount online because that would mean undercutting the stores that support me all year.”

Some readers will be familiar with K Kajoux’s handmade jewellery, all unique items crafted from semi-precious stones, swarovski crystals and freshwater pearls.

“We’re hoping people will think to just show a little solidarity with local businesses,” said Kay Lyng, who is also an advocate of the Trading Online Voucher Scheme (TOVS) hosted by the Local Enterprise Offices (LEOs) network.

Oisín Geoghegan, chair of the network of Local Enterprise Offices, said: “The Trading Online Voucher Scheme (TOVS) can make transformative changes to a small business.

Salina Skinny Bracelet, retails at €23.95 on www.kkajoux.com.
Salina Skinny Bracelet, retails at €23.95 on www.kkajoux.com.

In today’s ever-evolving business world, the ability to trade online and sell your products and services around the globe is essential in expanding revenue streams.

“Along with a grant of up to €2,500 to help them trade online the scheme also provides expert advise on how to set your business up online from experienced Local Enterprise Office mentors that is invaluable to small businesses taking that first step online.

"Getting trading online as a small business is a lot easier than you think.”

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