Measuring climate change’s true cost

Pedestrians pass a frozen water fountain at Bryant Park in New York last month when a polar vortex brought the worst freeze in over 40 years to parts of the US. Picture: AP

When the financial consequences finally sink in, people will — perhaps — start taking climate change more seriously and make the tough decisions needed, writes Kyran Fitzgerald.

The impact of the global environmental upheaval is being felt in myriad ways.

The most recent examples include a record breaking heatwave in Australia, deadly wildfires in California, and the strange polar vortex event that brought the worst freeze in over 40 years to the US mid-west along with temperatures in the Arctic that are way above average.

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