Lufthansa could face 'unlimited claims' after Alps plane disaster

Lufthansa could face 'unlimited claims' after Alps plane disaster

Lufthansa could face “unlimited” compensation claims for the crash that killed 150 people in the French Alps and it would be difficult, even counter-productive, for the German carrier to try to avoid liability, experts say.

Under a treaty governing deaths and injuries aboard international flights, airlines are required to compensate relatives of victims for proven damages of up to a limit currently set at about £100,000 – regardless of what caused the crash.

But higher compensation is possible if a carrier is held liable.

“More or less you will have unlimited financial damage,” said Marco Abate, a German aviation lawyer.

To avoid liability, a carrier has to prove that the crash was not due to “negligence or other wrongful act” by its employees, according to Article 21 of the 1999 Montreal Convention.

That would be a difficult argument to make when a pilot intentionally crashes a plane into a mountain, and one that Lufthansa would likely avoid as it could further damage the brand, Mr Abate said.

Investigators say the co-pilot of Germanwings Flight 9525 locked himself into the cockpit and slammed the Airbus A320 into the Alps. Germanwings is a subsidiary of Lufthansa.

Lufthansa chief executive Carsten Spohr says the airline will honour “international arrangements regulating liability” and noted that it has already offered immediate financial aid to anyone requiring it. He did not mention any figures.

How much the airline ends up paying in compensation will depend on where claims are filed. The options in this case, a German flight en route from Barcelona to Duesseldorf, are many, said Dutch lawyer Sander de Lang.

“For example, French law, because that is where it ... crashed, German law, because in most cases the passengers had return tickets to and from Germany. But some people may have bought tickets in Spain, then Spanish law could be appropriate,” he said.

In some countries including the Netherlands, there is no compensation for emotional suffering, he said.

Damages are typically much lower in Europe than in the US, where in domestic air crashes, juries have awarded plaintiffs sometimes millions per passenger.

Mr Abate said that in German courts, damages for pain and suffering typically do not exceed 10,000 euros (£7,000). However, Lufthansa could face much bigger claims for loss of financial support. If the breadwinner of a family was killed in a plane crash, the survivors can sue for years of lost income, Mr Abate said.

Several analysts said Lufthansa will probably reach settlements with relatives of victims to avoid going to court.

Once the shock and grief subsides, the compensation issues should be resolved quickly, said Wouter Munten, a Dutch lawyer representing relatives of victims of last year’s downing of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 in Ukraine.

“People always say take your time for grief,” he said. “But not everyone has the luxury to wait. Children have to be fed and go to school.”

More on this topic

Co-pilot of plane which crashed in Alps killing 150 acted alone, say prosecutorsCo-pilot of plane which crashed in Alps killing 150 acted alone, say prosecutors

Germanwings co-pilot researched drugs and willGermanwings co-pilot researched drugs and will

Hearse convoy to pass school as it brings bodies of Germanwings victims homeHearse convoy to pass school as it brings bodies of Germanwings victims home

Germanwings coffins arrive in DusseldorfGermanwings coffins arrive in Dusseldorf

More in this Section

In-demand teleconferencing firm Zoom hit by privacy fearsIn-demand teleconferencing firm Zoom hit by privacy fears

In-bound tourism spend set to plummet 70%In-bound tourism spend set to plummet 70%

Deal reached to lay off British Airways staff during Covid-19 crisisDeal reached to lay off British Airways staff during Covid-19 crisis

Denis O’Brien’s Digicel in €1.5bn debt write-off planDenis O’Brien’s Digicel in €1.5bn debt write-off plan


Lifestyle

One colour, so many moods; Annmarie O'Connor prepares us to embrace pink.Trend of the Week: Prepare to embrace pink

With the constant washing, the skin on my hands has become dry and brittle.Natural Health: Constant washing is damaging my hands

Most of the Tobacco Free Ireland programme team have been redeployed to assist with the pandemic, so I’m providing cover in their absence.Working Life: Elaine Buckely, National Tobacco Cessation Coordinator

Design Pop rescheduled to August 28-30.Chance to expand your creative horizons at rescheduled Cork festival

More From The Irish Examiner