Jobs demandon the increase

Jobs demandon the increase

By Geoff Percival

Dublin ranks as one of the most desirable places to which to relocate for work amongst UK employees, according to a new survey.

The study, by recruitment firm Morgan McKinley, found that despite being unhappy with the UK’s decision to leave the EU, over 40% of British-based workers do not plan to leave the country to seek work after Brexit, even if their employer looks to relocate.

That said, 22% said they were undecided and 37% said they would be prepared to move overseas. 

The latter group ranked Dublin and the US as the places they would most like to move to.

Despite the capital losing out to Frankfurt and Paris for a number of Brexit company relocations, only 8% of respondents to the survey selected Frankfurt and only 9% selected Paris as their favoured locations.

“There is no doubt EU citizens are leaving the UK to head back to home nations, which in turn threatens to damage the UK’s reputation in sectors such as technology and financial services,” said Morgan McKinley managing director Hakan Enver.

The research found that only 30% of UK professionals knew that their organisations have been making plans to relocate to other jurisdictions.

Meanwhile, latest data from Morgan McKinley’s Irish office show that job vacancy levels here rose by 5.5% on a monthly basis in April, but fell by 11.5% when measured on a year-on-year basis.

“Overall April was very strong from a jobs announcement perspective, particularly from the biopharma sector. We saw a number of large multinationals make significant job announcements in regional locations such as Dundalk, Louth and Meath ahead of locations such as Dublin and Cork. 

"We are now seeing the regions really starting to compete with urban locations in terms of job creation particularly in new emerging technologies,” said Morgan McKinley’s global foreign direct investment director Trayc Keevans.

The monitor also recorded a marginal increase in the number of professionals actively seeking new job opportunities in April, compared to 12 months previously.

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