ISEQ has slight fall in quiet trading

The Dublin Stock Exchange has had a quiet morning with a 1.6-point fall to 6,323.46 by 10.45am.

Bank of Ireland, who have recorded a 10c rise to €8.65, announced pre-tax profits to the end of March of more than €1.9bn - a rise of 6%. The bank has said the global economic down-turn has affected a number of areas of its business, with pre-tax profits in the life assurance section down 27%.

The financials were mixed with Irish Life and Permanent the biggest faller of the day so far, down 25c to €11.15. Anglo Irish Bank had a more modest two cent decrease to €9.37 while AIB saw its share price climb three cents to €13.63.

Elsewhere, the major riser was pharmaceutical giant Elan with a 22c increase to €16.09, while food group IAWS went up 10c to €15.70.

Construction shares were under fire with CRH down 15c to €24.40 and Kingspan slipping 11c to €7.39.

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