Irish Water admits breaking environmental laws after 2018 Malahide incident

Irish Water admits breaking environmental laws after 2018 Malahide incident

Irish Water has admitted breaking environmental laws over an incident Malahide marina in Dublin.

The company was accused of offences under the Waste Water Discharge (Authorisation) Regulations 2007 at Strand Road, Malahide, Co. Dublin on April 28, 2018 and on the following day.

The case has been brought at by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and was before Dublin District Court today.

Irish Water pleaded guilty to two charges: for not taking corrective actions, and not notifying the EPA about the incident as soon as practicable

The EPA withdrew a third charge for not having emergency response procedures in place that addressed any emergency situation on site.

Prosecuting solicitor Jason Teahan told Judge Anthony Halpin the case related to an incident at Malahide marina.

Defence counsel Eoghan Cole confirmed Irish Water was pleading guilty to the first two charges.

Judge Halpin adjourned the case until December 18 for the prosecution facts and the defence mitigation plea to be heard.

Last month the national water company pleaded guilty in another EPA prosecution over drinking water problems in Co. Cork. Judge Halpin has adjourned that case for facts, and a mitigation plea, to be given at a sentence hearing on January 8 next.

In that prosecution, it faces charges following a direction given on June 5, 2015 by the EPA in respect of supply of drinking water at Drimoleague and Kealkill.

It was alleged Irish Water failed to submit final reports to the EPA before the end of 2018, verifying that trihalomethanes (THMs) levels were not excessive.

THMs, which can have a can have possible carcinogenic effects if consumed over long periods, are bi-product of chlorination to disinfect ground water which makes its way into the supply.

More on this topic

Man due in court in connection with assault and robbery in CorkMan due in court in connection with assault and robbery in Cork

Meath man, 21, accused of assaulting and robbing transgender escort told gardai he was attacked first with stilettoMeath man, 21, accused of assaulting and robbing transgender escort told gardai he was attacked first with stiletto

Judge orders release of 'exploited' cannabis grow house worker who court hears will now seek asylumJudge orders release of 'exploited' cannabis grow house worker who court hears will now seek asylum

In significant ruling court says barring order must be shown to have been 'produced' to breach accusedIn significant ruling court says barring order must be shown to have been 'produced' to breach accused

More in this Section

China welcomes preliminary deal in trade war it blames on USChina welcomes preliminary deal in trade war it blames on US

Irish shares climb as election drives sterlingIrish shares climb as election drives sterling

Profits fall at hotel groupProfits fall at hotel group

Profits rise 35% as gym group Flyefit expandsProfits rise 35% as gym group Flyefit expands


Lifestyle

Want to be cultured this Christmas? From TV to podcasts to books, Ed Power has the definite list of everything you missed this year - so you can curl up on the couch and catch upThe definite list of everything you missed this year

Artist Ciara Rodgers teaches older people how to rediscover their creativity and regain confidence, says Rowena WalshBrush with art: Discovering your creative side in later life

Furniture, paintings, jewellery and silver are on offer at James Adam in Dublin, writes Des O’SullivanAll set for home run: See what's on offer at the James Adam sale in Dublin

It’s not too late to hunt out a unique gift. Des O’Sullivan previews sales in the lead-up to the festive seasonA flurry of auctions in Munster sets the scene for Christmas

More From The Irish Examiner