Ireland's per capita debt level stands at €44,365

Ireland's per capita debt level stands at €44,365

Ireland's per capita debt level stands at €44,365, new figures released by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) show.

The debt owed by every man, woman and child in the country after the first three months of this year is significantly higher than the €10,667 owed in 2007 before the crash.

However, it is slightly lower than the peak reached in the first quarter of 2013 which equated to debt of €47,514 per person.

The data was released by the CSO today under the Government Finance Statistics Quarterly Results.

The figures show that the government recorded a deficit of €1.8bn in the first quarter of 2019.

This accounts for 2.2% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the quarter.

Revenue was up on the same period last year, with the rise by €900m to €18.7bn mainly attributed to increases in taxes and social contributions.

Government expenditure was also up by €900m on the first quarter of 2018 to €20.5bn.

Figures released by the CSO yesterday showed that the Irish economy is estimated to have grown by 8.2% last year.

GDP stood at €324bn in2018, while Gross National Product (GNP), a measure of economic activity that excludes the profits of multi-nationals, grew by 6.5% in the year.

More on this topic

Euro currency focus on two confidence votes: Italy and Boris JohnsonEuro currency focus on two confidence votes: Italy and Boris Johnson

Consumer confidence in Irish economy at six year lowConsumer confidence in Irish economy at six year low

Trade tensions could force Fed to cut deeperTrade tensions could force Fed to cut deeper

Varadkar criticises people predicting a crash 'around every corner'Varadkar criticises people predicting a crash 'around every corner'

More in this Section

Huawei in US short reprieveHuawei in US short reprieve

No-deal Brexit tariffs could ‘massively reduce’ competitiveness, warn British farmersNo-deal Brexit tariffs could ‘massively reduce’ competitiveness, warn British farmers

UK brewer agrees £2.7bn sale to Hong Kong’s CKAUK brewer agrees £2.7bn sale to Hong Kong’s CKA

Abbey boss sees pay rise 15% despite profit collapseAbbey boss sees pay rise 15% despite profit collapse


Lifestyle

Timothy Grady is in Bantry this week to host a concert, and read from his classic book about the Irish in London, writes Don O'Mahony.Giving voice to the emigrant experience

A care home builds links with kids, writes Helen O’Callaghan.Inside out: Children learn what it's like to live with dementia.

When you think of someone who is “into skincare”, you probably imagine someone in a face mask.The Skin Nerd: Why face masks aren’t as important as you’d think

With the evenings closing in and a welcome chill in the air, it’s time to embrace the new season now.Make the Transition: Turn over a new leaf this fall

More From The Irish Examiner